Tag Archives: Wall Street Journal

“Oh, son of a…! That’s gonna leave a mark!

The headline of this post is a quote from the 1995 comedy “Tommy Boy.” But it could have been the shouts of frustration emanating from the offices of JPMorgan’s communications team yesterday. In a move that has many people scratching their heads, JPMorgan, the largest investment bank in the United States, decided to hold Twitter […]

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Marketing is the New Journalism

And journalism is the new marketing. For better or worse, we are moving rapidly into a state of brand-produced journalism.  It’s happening on two fronts: Sponsored Content and Brand Publishing Sponsored Content There’s no doubt traditional media companies are dropping like flies.  Circulations and subscriptions have flat-lined – print advertising revenue is moving to digital […]

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Pitching Social Content

In the swirling storm of social media its popular to frown on the old-fashioned notion of pitching “traditional” media. How many times have you been told that media relations is dead? Well, it isn’t.  In fact, it’s importance may be on the verge of a major upswing. First, can we please dispel the term “traditional […]

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One in Three Internet Users is on Facebook

Facebook has become so big and powerful that communicators and marketers should consider it as another category outside of the web.  In other words, brands need an online strategy – and a Facebook strategy. Here’s why. The population of the world is projected to be about 6.9 billion people at the end of 2011.  Just […]

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Old Media Isn’t So Old Anymore

Is old media making a comeback? In fact, is it fair to even refer to traditional media outlets like newspapers and magazines as “old” anymore.  They have infused their online properties with interactive and multimedia elements and syndicate their content on social networking sites like Facebook and Twitter. For example, the New York Times and […]

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Should I Pay or Should I Go? Do Newspaper Paywalls Work?

Should newspapers close their free websites and erect paywalls?  A paywall requires readers to pay for access to the newspapers’ news, features, opinions and other content. Paywalls have been met with outright scorn by advocates of “free” information.  They have also had limited success. The Wall Street Journal has been success with its paywall.  But […]

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Charging for Local “News” Content

The Telegram & Gazette in Worcester, Massachusetts is embarking on a risky proposition.  It will begin to charge readers for online news stories produced by its editors and reporters (while supposedly keeping wire copy and other syndicated content free). The T&G is one of the largest daily newspapers in New England and covers the state’s […]

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The Great Media Collapse of 2009: Part 2

Back in March I predicted 2009 to be the year of the Great Media Collapse. That the powerful forces of the global economic meltdown, plummeting advertising costs, and the shift of readers from print to the web would force seismic changes on traditional media. It’s been even worse than I thought.  Are we sure it […]

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Ugly Week for Print Media

It was a terrible week for the mainstream media in a year that I’ve called the Great Media Collapse of 2009.  The struggling economy, plummeting ad sales, and the proliferation of content on the web as been a 1-2-3 punch that the traditional press has been unable to withstand. But the news this week seemed […]

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BusinessWeek Sells for Less Than a 4-bedroom Condo in Manhattan

Another sign in of the Great Media Collapse of 2009: BusinessWeek apparently sold to Bloomberg for $5 million yesterday. That’s right.  Bloomberg purchased the staid, 80-year-old business magazine for less than the cost of a four bedroom condo on the Upper East Side of Manhattan. Here’s the Wall Street Journal: “The purchase price wasn’t disclosed, […]

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