Tag Archives: Pew Research Center

Facebook is Kinda Sorta Old

Facebook recently turned 10 years old. The most startling statistic about Facebook  out of that milestone was this one: The average age of an American Facebook user is 41. Try to wrap your head around that for a moment. Facebook started out as a network for college students back in 2004. For its first two […]

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All the Fake News That’s Fit to Print

Here’s how many people now get their news and information: Google Twitter Facebook In other words, through search and social media. It works one of two ways: People go to a search engine, enter a search term, and then click on a link within the top 10 search results People scroll through their social media […]

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Only Dead Old People Read the News

Where O where have younger readers gone? Probably to Buzzfeed. Or to YouTube. Maybe they’re making a Vine. Or texting their friends. Or playing a video game. One thing is certain. Millennials probably aren’t reading your news. Why? They don’t like news. At least that’s the conclusion of a new research study by Pew Research. […]

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Marketing is the New Journalism

And journalism is the new marketing. For better or worse, we are moving rapidly into a state of brand-produced journalism.  It’s happening on two fronts: Sponsored Content and Brand Publishing Sponsored Content There’s no doubt traditional media companies are dropping like flies.  Circulations and subscriptions have flat-lined – print advertising revenue is moving to digital […]

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3 Ways to Save Journalism from Extinction

Let this statistic sink in for a moment. Total number of journalists in the U.S.: 40,000 Total number of Google employees: 54,000 Google was founded in 1998.  Journalism may have died around the same time. Try this one on for size. There are 3.6 public relations professionals for every single journalist.  Nearly 4 to 1. […]

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The Great Media Collapse Has Been Epic

The business of journalism and news reporting isn’t much of a business anymore.  The damage – like a super hurricane battering a low-lying coastal village – has been epic. The collapse, which started in earnest in 2009, has continued unabated since.  By the end of this decade we’ll be lucky if any of the huts […]

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The Day of Infamy for Newspapers

For the newspapers, July 1, 1980 is a day of infamy. (And no, it isn’t because at the time “Do That To Me One More Time” by Captain & Tennille was one of the biggest hit songs.) July 1, 1980 is the day when the Columbus Dispatch launched the first newspaper website and put free […]

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Journalism Ethics in the 86,400-second News Cycle

It is difficult to imagine the ethical journey for journalists who would authorize hacking into a missing teenage girl’s mobile phone in order to scour the content for a salacious headline. Worse is when these same journalists then delete messages from a full voicemail box so that additional messages could be left behind – giving […]

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Is American Journalism Working Anymore?

Peter Finley Dunn, the late writer and humorist, once described the role of journalism to “comfort the afflicted, afflict the comfortable.” When I was a journalist, Dunn’s quote was at the heart of how I practiced the craft.  I believed deeply in Dunn’s assessment and even scribbled the quote onto my journalism notebooks as a […]

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Checking In, Isn’t Catching On – At Least Not Yet

On a personal level, I’ve never been a big fan of location-based social networks (LBS) like Foursquare or Gowalla.  In fact, I’ve resisted using them, mostly due to privacy concerns. And, yes, you can argue that a blogger with a LinkedIn profile, Facebook page, Posterous account, Twitter account, etc… must be nuts if he draws […]

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