The “Like” Button Needs Some Friends


The “Like” button has become an iconic symbol of content sharing on social networks.  It is the virtual expression of approval and agreement.  A way to pass along a piece of content – be it photo, application, article or blog post – to our friends, family and co-workers.

But there are challenges with the “Like” button.  There’s no avoiding the obvious – it’s wishy-washy.  Liking something is about as vanilla as it gets.  It’s like calling somebody “nice,” which is about as vague and devoid of details as any word in the English language.

That’s “Like” in a nutshell.  Do you really want to eat in a restaurant people “like?”  Or read a book that gets a lot of “likes?”  What does “liking” something really mean?  Don’t we want to use online and social media communications to be specific?

The solution is clear.

We need more buttons.

Here are some necessary additions:

DISLIKE

 

 

 

 

 

 

Why: Well, obviously for things you don’t like, but dislike

Examples of Usage: When your younger brother reminds you that it’s your 30th, 40th, 50th or 60th birthday; When someone points out that you misspelled a word or used improper grammar.

HATE

 

 

 

 

 

Why: When dislike just won’t do.

Examples of Usage: To provide polite discord to any political discussion; to show your disdain for celebrities; to rally your friends to a gang fight.

ZIP IT

 

 

 

 

 

Why: When you just can’t take… one… more… word.

Examples of Usage: When your aunt posts photographs of her recent colonoscopy; when your co-worker begins posting long descriptions of his vacation to Paris; anyone who posts wine reviews; anyone using Spotify.

VOMIT

 

 

 

 

 

Why: Some kinds of content kinda want to make you puke…

Examples of Usage: When your buddy posts of a photograph of the weeks-past-expiration-date carton of milk that he accidentally drank; when your girlfriend changes her profile picture to one of her and her new boyfriend kissing; when your cousin starts discussing in detail what she found in Junior’s diaper.

YOU WORE THAT?

 

 

 

 

Why: Have you seen your father-in-law’s wardrobe?

Examples of Usage: After anyone posts a photograph of themselves in a Hawaiian shirt, a bridesmaid gown, fedora, skinny jeans, or in a scoop neck blouse that, well, reveals a bit too much; after your overweight brother-in-law posts a video of his trip to the pebble beaches of Nice – wearing a Speedo.

SCARY

 

 

 

 

 

 

Why: Because we don’t have privacy anymore and we should…

Examples of Usage: When you need to tell the creepy guy from accounting to stop trolling your LinkedIn and Facebook profiles; when friends check into massage parlors.

HELL YEAH

 

 

 

 

 

Why: When a like just doesn’t have that rebel yell quality.

Examples of Usage: When your boyfriend finally pops the question; when you get that promotion you’ve been dreaming of; when your sports team wins the big game.

Please feel free to share you own suggestions in the comments!

4 Responses to “The “Like” Button Needs Some Friends”

  1. Move over Facebook ‘like’ button, we’ve now got Pinterest’s “repin” button –not to be confused with Tumblr’s “reblog” button.

  2. Hi Darryl:
    Remember when buttons were on your shirt?

  3. I “liked” this post – but what I really wanted to do was “hell yeah” it! I could find so many uses for the “vomit” button. Damn – I would vomit all over Facebook.

  4. от *This is getting a bit more suctvbjiee, but I much prefer the Zune Marketplace. The interface is colorful, has more flair, and some cool features like ‘Mixview’ that let you quickly see related albums, songs, or other users related to what you’re listening to. Clicking on one of those will center on that item, and another set of “neighbors” will come into view, allowing you to navigate around exploring by similar artists, songs, or users. Speaking of users, the Zune “Social” is also great fun, letting you find others with shared tastes and becoming friends with them. You then can listen to a playlist created based on an amalgamation of what all your friends are listening to, which is also enjoyable. Those concerned with privacy will be relieved to know you can prevent the public from seeing your personal listening habits if you so choose.

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